Brain dump: Being a test lead

I’m grooming a team mate to become a test lead. What makes this role different from being a tester?

As a tester, your focus is on your test assignments. But as you become more senior (and not just when you become a test lead), you need to start looking at the bigger picture. Not just in terms of functions being tested e.g., you become more concerned as the system as a whole. But you also start seeing your purpose in the software engineering process i.e., you’re an integral part of it and what you want to deliver aren’t test cases or bugs but rather an application that has been fortified by your testing, an application that the target end-user will actually want to use. Software isn’t made to just make jobs for us who are in the business of delivering software. Software is for helping people do the stuff they need.

I guess I’m getting ahead of myself with that explanation and that might be too much to take in.

So a simpler answer…

  • As a test lead, you need to be able to coordinate test tasks among the test team.
  • There’s also a lot of admin work like you need to be able to note attendance or how to contact folks just in case they don’t show up.
  • You also need to watch out for risks, dependencies, assumptions, constraints (or basically anything that could go wrong), and for issues (when things went wrong), and capture lessons learned. As a tester, you already do this but it scales up when you’re the test lead.
  • You also act as a representative of the test team — if there are concerns that they hesitate to raise, you have to either encourage them to raise it or raise it yourself.
  • You need to be able to initiate creation of templates, standards, guidelines, workflows that will help the test team do their work.
  • You need to be able to review other testers’ work — be it test case drafting, test execution, bug reporting, status reporting.
  • You need to be on your toes in case something tricky or complex comes along so that you can suggest options or strategies on how to go about with it.
  • You also need to be able to take the blunt hits for your team when something doesn’t work out, because in a way you are more accountable if you’re the “lead” in general. You might think leads or project managers have it easy because most of the time it looks like they’re just doing reports or asking others to do the work. But when shit hits the fan and the team doesn’t deliver, someone’s going to look for a neck to choke and often it’s theirs.

Ok. That’s about all I can write this morning. Till my next brain dump.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s