More on When in Rome

One of the things I often say is “When in Rome, do as the Romans do.” I have some team mates who admittedly know me better than most that jokingly say what I really mean is “When in Rome, invade the Romans.” While I have no plans for domination (that’s just too much trouble), a lot of jokes are half-meant.

“When in Rome, do as the Romans do” is not a call for conformity, submissiveness, or withdrawing your own beliefs to follow someone else’s. To me, it’s about flexibility and just being plainly realistic that when you’re thrust into a new environment (be it a new company, a team, or a project) you can’t expect things to go your way or the old way that you know. You need to “do as the Romans do” to survey the environment, find out how things are being done, and more importantly to find out why things are being done a certain way.

There’s a saying that goes first learn the rules then break them. “Doing as the Romans do” allows you to learn the rules. This gives you the context and is essential for finding out which rules you can break or to how much extent can you push the limits of the rules. I don’t generally condone rule-breaking (I hate jaywalkers), but sometimes there are just BS rules (Google: sacred cows) which were set in place ages ago that are no longer relevant to the current situation. To me, rules (just like tools and processes) should be there to help make things easier or move things along more easily. If it’s more of a pain in the ass, then something’s wrong.

And I guess this is where “invading Rome” comes in. Armed with what you’ve learned from “doing as the Romans”, you are in a better position to trigger change. You also pick up on how to go about it, say who you need to talk to effect change more easily. But before we all go on a changing spree, one other important thing for me is to choose your battles. Not everything is worth rallying change for. I am not religious but the serenity prayer* says it best: Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

[* N/A when I’m driving.]

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