Read: Leading the Transformation

Our product owner is one of the rare few individuals I know at work who actually still reads books. Last month, he recommended that we read Leading the Transformation: Applying Agile and DevOps Principles at Scale by Gary Gruver and Tommy Mouser. It’s a thin book with only 112 pages on paperback and around a 3-hour read. It’s intended for leaders/executives so it gives a high level overview of the changes teams and the organization need to make and the benefit of those changes, and it repeatedly emphasizes management’s role in pushing for those changes. In particular, the changes that they want to drive at center around Agile, DevOps and Continuous Delivery (CD).

At work, small teams have now been shifting to Agile, our own team has been in this Agile project since January of last year, and I’ve heard of proposals wherein the methodology they suggest is already Agile instead of Waterfall. But then, I pick up from the book that trying to scale up Agile adoption across the board with small teams as the starting point doesn’t quite work for large organizations. Whoops. The book suggests that if you want an enterprise-level change, you have to plan for it and drive it from the management level down to us lowly minions. A key difference though is that within our organization (at least locally that I know of), we don’t really have hundreds of developers working on the same product or code base. And in our case, we’re only under 20 in the team, but even so the book still offers a good introduction to a lot of mature development practices that we need to look into.

Key items highlighted in the book that I’d like to reiterate further:

Importance of having quick feedback loops

Unit tests and static analysis tools can already weed out a lot of problems so that defective code won’t even get committed to the repository to begin with. And having those fixes done even before passing it to the test team — instead of fixing them only after the code has been deployed and testers found issues that were caused by those defects — will definitely help reduce the turnaround time.

Quick feedback loops will also help the team work and resolve issues while the code or user story is still relatively fresh in their heads. It’s more difficult for both the devs and testers to fix and retest an issue on a behavior that they’ve pretty much forgotten about.

Having builds as release- or production-ready as possible

With regular and stable builds in place, it’ll be easier to identify when a commit breaks the build. Since you don’t have to backtrack through days or weeks of commits, it’ll be easier to narrow down and identify the problematic commit.

Having dev/test environments as close to production as possible

One problem that we’ve personally encountered in not having a test environment in sync with the production version was that whenever we encountered an odd behavior in the test environment we had to double check whether the issue was also in prod. We also had to be mindful of issues that were already resolved in prod but not in the test environment. But I guess this problem is a combination of why it’s good to have the test environment as close to prod as possible and the next item related to why it’s good to have good deployment procedures in place.

Having repeatable build, deploy and test processes

From experience and the example above, having a reliable and repeatable deployment process could’ve saved us all effort and heartache. It could be so frustrating to test the same build (supposedly) but then get different outputs even if you’ve done the same steps using the same test data. In the same vein, you’d hate for a feature not to work in prod even if it had already been thoroughly code reviewed, tested and signed-off in UAT/PO review.

And last, but not the least, having test automation

You simply will never achieve the full benefit of Agile development until you get your automated testing properly built out and integrated into the development pipeline.

Test automation is key to the first item I mentioned since it enables quick feedback loops. It also allows repeatable tests to be executed across the different environments, and it allows repeated execution of the regression tests which you might not be able to afford to do so manually.

Having test automation, by itself, will not suffice. Tests have to be designed such that it’ll be easy to localize the cause of failed tests should any be encountered. Maintainability of the automated tests also have to be considered. Otherwise, the benefits of test automation won’t be realized since the team ends up ignoring the test results on account of being not sure whether the issue encountered is a code issue or a test issue.

One last thing… it’s a cultural shift

You can’t just invest on tools for CD or test automation or announce “Let’s do the Agile thing”, and expect the benefits to magically follow right away. This kind of thing takes time because there’s the technical learning overhead, plus shifting to a new way of doing things requires discipline and resolve so that folks won’t revert to the old habits that they’re trying to change.

It is important for executives to understand early on if the organization is embracing this cultural change, because if it doesn’t, all the investments in technical changes will be a waste of time.

It’s not going to be enough for the project team alone to be invested in the changes. The management and executives need to be aligned with this. In fact, they should help drive it. Otherwise, they might give demands that would bypass the adoption of change and instead force people back to their old habits (just because it might appear faster but only in the short term).

The book, after all, isn’t entitled “Leading the Transformation” for nothing. Management’s presence and push isn’t merely a suggestion; it’s a necessity. Sure, the project teams are the ones making the technical changes; but management needs to understand and support the changes. Essentially, people need to be in the same page in order to move in the same direction.

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One thought on “Read: Leading the Transformation

  1. Pingback: Testing Bits – 3/20/16 – 3/26/16 | Testing Curator Blog

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