Keep the Backlog clean

I just mariekondo’d our backlog. So far, so good, I’ve removed 85 items from the backlog — 53 of which were over 200 days old! My thinking is if we won’t be touching them anytime soon or at all, I want them out of the backlog.

Idk but some lessons to share or possibly reminders to my future self here…

  • Get to know your tool – Find out how you can “archive” user stories that you want shelved, and also how you can access the shelved items in the future just in case you need to. Until recently, my options in the tool was limited to either delete or mark as done (which I didn’t want to do for items we won’t actually work on). We then found out that we can do project customization in the tool contrary to what we’ve been initially told, and so I’ve tweaked the workflow to also consider user stories that I want shelved.
  • Housekeeping keeps the backlog tool more usable – At some point, it was hard to move things around the backlog because of too many useless items that cluttered the list. Having a lean backlog also makes the items we actually need to work on more visible.
  • Maybe it shouldn’t be a list of wishful thinking, or a place for idea dumps – And TIL, using the backlog as a storage of ideas is a Product Backlog Anti-pattern.
  • Keep it aligned with the roadmap – Again, (“The product backlog is not reflecting the roadmap.”) another anti-pattern. I guess in conjunction with the previous item, a lot of the user stories that I cleaned up were raw ideas that they had wanted to build “someday”. Keep it real by keeping the backlog items as a list of things the team will actually work on.
  • Avoid / minimize duplication – For some reason, if a user story has to be kept duplicated, ensure they are linked to each other. The risk of duplication is in case of refinements, updates might be made on just one of the user stories when in reality you want it to be carried out across all.
  • Do periodic cleanups – This clean up is not and should not be a one time thing to keep the backlog relevant. An idea I picked up here is about setting a limit to your Design in Progress (DIP) or the number of items you have in the backlog.
  • Be mindful of what you add in the backlog – You don’t want the backlog items to keep growing and growing and revert back to a state you find less desirable. And an idea I picked up here is about setting a limit to your Design in Progress (DIP) or the number of items you have in the backlog.

So there, future me, keep the backlog clean. Keep it useful not only for yourself, but more importantly, for the rest of the team.

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