Slideshare: 26 Time Management Hacks I Wish I’d Known at 20 by @egarbugli

I stumbled upon this deck again and it’s really something that I want to share to the younger ones. Time management wasn’t exactly something I learned when I was starting out. I came from projects where OT would become the norm at certain points, and we even had Saturday work. I was so time-poor. As I grew older, I came to realize how valuable my time is. How I could make up for losses for some things, but I can never get back time I have lost or wasted. And that the more efficiently I manage my time will allow me to spend it on things that matter more.

Saved myself some time by not writing my own presentation covering the same topic.

One of the points I like is #18 which had a quote from Jason Cohen (@asmartbear):

Only ever work on the thing that will have the biggest impact.

I think most especially for the younger ones, we often get sidetracked by initiatives or other non-project related tasks. We fill up our plate with a lot of things. We say “yes” to this and that. But then you have to think about it, step back and look at the big picture, and reflect whether the things that you are doing are really the things that you need to grow or achieve your goals. As an aspiring tester/technologist, are these tasks really relevant to making myself more technical and capable in my craft?

On being overwhelmed (an open letter to the new guys)

Hi, guys…

We’re three weeks in our current project. I know it’s still a period of adjustment for you. You have a lot to take in, and I’ve been asking you to do stuff that is new to you. I know things can be a bit difficult at first. You might feel overwhelmed. You might just want to curl up into a fetal position, hug your favorite stuff toy, and just wish everything away. I know, I’ve been there. And I’m here to tell you to not despair.

Sometimes it’s the fear of having to do something big that freezes us into inaction. We end up not accomplishing anything because our minds are too caught up at the scope of what we have to accomplish.

It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult. ~ Seneca

When you feel like there’s too much in your plate, here’s what you can do. Take a step back, breathe in, breathe out. Don’t try to tackle everything at once. That’ll just be crazy. Find out what you need to prioritize at the moment, then focus on those. Try to break up the work into smaller bite-sized portions. Taking it one step at a time will make it less stressful and less daunting for you. Sometimes it’s just hard to get the ball to start rolling, but once kicked off, things get easier as you go along.

When you feel like you’re sinking, do not hesitate to call out for help. You must remember that you are not alone in this project. Your team mates are here, we’ve got our senior test automation engineer (Sr. TAE), and I am here (I’m not just a pretty face, you know). We also have support from our team leads and our manager. Don’t take asking for help as a sign of defeat or something that will be taken against you. That may be the case in other cultures or other teams, but I assure you that it’s not the case with me. But don’t take this as a cue that you can just ask for help anytime and every time. What I’d want is for you to learn how to help yourself first. And if you come to the point when you’re already doing your best and things are still not working out, that is when you reach out.

So there. I hope you don’t feel too overwhelmed. Know that you can rise above that feeling and that you have my support.

In the end, everything will be okay. If it’s not okay, it’s not yet the end. ~ Fernando Sabino, translated from Portuguese

Cheers,
KC