Finished reading: Managing the Test People

It’s a quick and easy read as it promised to be. I’m not a manager and it’s not something I’m planning to be. But I am somewhat in a position of leadership so the book is still quite relevant to me. Judging by how much I’ve highlighted in the book, it’s undeniably quite relevant.

I’m also working with younger folks who I believe have great potential to be leaders. They can be even better leaders than who we have at the moment, but only if they’re positively influenced by the right mindset on both leadership and technical aspects.

I’d go recommend this book to them since the author really paints a great picture of a leader (or manager) to aspire to be. And with its focus on testing teams — or technical teams in general — it’s a perfect fit for us. Reading the book raises the bar for our expectations on managers but only as it should be because we can’t expect nothing less than for our managers to lead and empower their people. You also get insights on how managers should (better) deal with things. But more than that, and I guess what’s most important, you also get to pick up and be reminded on how you should be as a leader (even if not by title).

In closing, the author shares:

Stay on the right path by frequently asking yourself, “Am I being honest? Am I being consistent? Would I want to work with* me?”

*Originally “for”. But since we’re not bosses or managers, “with” seems more relatable.

Maybe that simple level of introspection — especially on that last question — is what we all need to remind us to be first and foremost good colleagues or team mates before even rising to becoming good leaders.

On valuing your time, Maker’s and manager’s schedules

Time and again, my hate for useless meetings seems to keep on drawing me to Paul Graham’s essay “Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule”. (And also, I did tell a friend I’ll go share this link with her). Every time I read it, I couldn’t help but agree to a lot of the things he said. So much so that I find it hard to cite just one particular line to quote here in this post. You really just have to read the whole thing yourself.

To me, this essay is a pretty good reminder of what we should all be doing (just in case I’ve lapsed, and have been setting meetings or following up like there’s no tomorrow), and that is to respect my own time and other people’s time. In doing that, you make a more conscious effort to (well, if i can help it):

  • avoid interrupting or disturbing people unnecessarily
  • express gratitude when someone obliges you with their time
  • be present in meetings where your inputs or feedback are actually needed
  • set up meetings with the implicit target of not wasting people’s time
  • decline meetings I’m pretty sure I won’t be engaged in
  • decline meetings when they’re in conflict of personal commitments — Those are just as important (and sometimes even more) as work commitments
  • honor commitments to yourself — Ages ago, I had to block of time just for my lunch or dinner, and I even missed that because of work. That just isn’t healthy. Also when you block off time to work on something, then use that time to be productive.

Discipline on how you manage your time or own your own calendar starts with one’s self. And how badly your time gets mistreated by others (and even by yourself) highly depends on how much you’d allow it. So for your sake, start respecting and managing your time.

Reads: Creating a Modern Mentoring Culture by Randy Emelo

I finished a couple of books last week, though I’m not sure if the 20-page “infoline” counts. So anyways, one is this infoline I read on “Creating a Modern Mentoring Culture” by Randy Emelo over at Books24x7. Here are just some of the stuff that I’ve highlighted for myself and for sharing:

Modern mentoring is connecting people across an organization to share critical knowledge and skills. Everyone has something to learn and something to teach, regardless of age or title, and people can be both mentees and mentors at the same time.

Key Pillars of Modern Mentoring

  • Open and Egalitarian
    • everyone has something to learn and something to teach
  • Diverse
    • different perspectives within mentoring communities and relationships help novel ideas and approaches arise in answer to organizational problems or issues people are facing
  • Safe and Judgment-Free
    • people don’t want to show perceived weaknesses by asking for a mentor
  • Independent and Autonomous
    • no need to try to control the amount of time people spend engaged in mentoring, the topics they connect around, or the people with whom they connect.
    • Too much rigid control will only create unwanted barriers to knowledge flowing from those who possess it to those who seek it.
    • Once you have created an enabling structure for modern mentoring, let your employees take the reins of their own learning.
  • Asynchronous
    • technology-enabled communication (email, online communities of interest, business social networks, mentoring and social learning software) is only on the rise and is a key enabling structure that supports modern mentoring
  • Self-Directed and Personal
    • Self-directed learning also allows individuals to learn what is applicable to them right now, gain skills that can help them with their unique work context, and make them more productive.
  • Technology-Centric
    • means to connect with others and a space to collaborate and communicate
  • Flexible
    • allowed and encouraged to shift in and out of your mentoring program and of the mentee-mentor roles themselves, as learning needs and knowledge strengths evolve

If the open nature of modern mentoring is compromised by too much organizational involvement, the quality of mentoring connections and the caliber of learning that takes place as a result of these connections will be degraded.

Creating a Modern Mentoring Culture

  • Re-Educate Leaders
    • need to help organizational stakeholders understand the expanded and broad vision of modern mentoring and its associated benefits
    • must be re-educated to understand that modern mentoring is a productive activity that won’t detract from employees’ effectiveness, but rather will help to strengthen it.
  • Get the word out
    • webinars or e-briefings, various media (podcasts, webinars, or newsletters), brief “commercials” at other training events
    • Sponsor roadshows or lunch-and-learns where mentoring participants share their experiences. Offering a venue for mentoring participants to meet and mingle can help energize your program and provides another opportunity for people to network and make learning connections.
    • Leverage employee resource groups, town hall meetings where a brief presentation could be followed by a question and answer session, Leverage your program’s evangelists.
  • Modernize Current Mentoring Programs
    • expanding your current mentoring programs and making them modern
    • Onboarding – new hires
    • High-potential development
      • brightest talent pull from an array of mentors and knowledge resources [instead of just one mentor]
      • allow high-potentials to be mentors themselves and share their knowledge with others while concurrently learning how to be a leader
    • Augment your formal training initiatives with mentoring cohorts
      • alumni of training programs mentor and advise a group of people currently going through training
      • Peers going through the same training can also connect and share stories around application of concepts learned in class to help cement the newly attained knowledge.
  • Amplify Using Technology
    • Let employees use technologies you have available to communicate and collaborate.
    • Make online employee directories or other skill profiles available to help participants see who would be a good mentoring connection.
    • Allow people to join your mentoring program at any time.
    • Acknowledge the efforts of those in the program.