Reads: On skills for Product Management

This morning’s read tried to capture the job of a PM into 4 words: “Figure out what’s next.” I think in the work we do in building software (regardless of what your role is in your Agile project), we have to do a lot of figuring out. Coming with ideas or solutions independently is so important, and so is working collaboratively to further refine those solutions. Although it’s important to differentiate when it’s collaborating from spoon-feeding or unnecessary hand-holding.

Anyways, the post also enumerates 7 core skills to build for the Product Management role (actual text from the post are in bold, elaborations that follow are mine). But regardless of what role you are in the project, I think these contribute to being a good team player.

1. Taking any problem and being able to develop a strategy to resolve it — When you’re in the business of building software, figuring things out (preferably independently, with little to no hand-holding) is a critical skill.

2. Executing, getting shit done*in any role, this is valuable*

3. Communication — *same… in any role, you need this*

4. Leadership through influence

5. Making decisions, informed by data

6. Building great products, and having taste — As PM/PO/PPO/BA, you work closely with your designers. I think you also need to brush up on UX so that you don’t undo any of the good work your UX designers present to you for your feedback.

7. Always be prepared — *important for any role* I like the quote the author shared.

[Great PMs] say what they’ll do, and then do what they say. Their follow-through is impeccable, and they don’t let details slip. When they join a team, quality and pace seems to dramatically improve overnight.
— Noah Weiss

And I couldn’t agree more with his recommendations for developing your “I got this” aura. Over the years, I’ve worked with a few folks who would sound like they’re so unsure of what they’re doing. It just doesn’t bode well — it doesn’t give the team (or worse, their stakeholders) confidence that they’ll get the work done. I mean it’s OK to admit that you don’t know everything, because no one does — even “experts!” And it happens, I’ve gotten into countless of interactions where I really have no idea on what to do. But I guess my confidence (or my display of not panicking) stems from knowing that I have the capability and means to figure it out. (And that it’s not the end of the world if I don’t.)

So anyways, I’ve rambled on. Go check the post for the recommendations!